OPEN DAILY 9:30 to 5

Lecture: Navigating Change in Cuba: Studying Maritime Tourism Onboard a Tall Ship and a Cruise Ship

Maine Maritime Museum 243 Washington St, Bath, ME

In 2017, Dr Tracy Michaud led a group of students from the University of Southern Maine to Cuba to explore the fundamental transformations that occurred during the restoration of US-Cuban diplomatic relations. Dr Michaud will share how students were able to explore this historic change from the unique perspective of maritime tourism development aboard the schooner Harvey Gamage.

Sailor Valentines and Caribbean Travel Trinkets

Looking for inspiration for that perfect Valentine’s gift? Early mariners knew where to go – Barbados! This Caribbean island monopolized the production of seashell trinkets to profit from sailors looking for something to take home to their sweethearts. Join Manager of Interpretation Sarah Timm for a family-friendly exploration of these unique objects, and create your own Sailor's Valentine to take home! All materials provided. FREE with admission This event is part of our winter programming series On Deck.

A Look at Maine and the Caribbean through Contemporary Art

Jaime DeSimone, Associate Curator of Contemporary Art at the Portland Museum of Art, will lead an engaging in-gallery discussion at Maine Maritime Museum on race, identity, post-colonialism, and cultural boundaries in the Caribbean as an epilogue and response to our current exhibit, The Tropics Next Door: A Look at Maine and the Caribbean. Jaime’s work on the PMA’s new exhibit, Relational Undercurrents: Contemporary Art of the Caribbean Archipelago will bring new insights on American-Caribbean relations as expressed through Contemporary Caribbean artists. FREE with admission This event is part of our winter programming series On Deck.

The USS Maine and American Propaganda

The explosion and sinking of the USS Maine off the coast of Cuba on February 15, 1898, set off a media storm of battling headlines and fake stories in American newspapers. Join Curator of Exhibits Christopher Timm to flip through the pages and images that culminated in a dramatic shift in U.S. and Caribbean relations. FREE with admission. This event is part of our winter programming series On Deck.

46th Annual Albert Reed & Thelma Walker Maritime Symposium: Changing Environments

Maine Maritime Museum 243 Washington St, Bath, ME

Registration for Symposium is now closed. Contact Guest Services at (207) 443-1316 x331 with questions. Mariners and those who depend on the sea cause and respond to cultural, economic, and ecological changes. This symposium takes an interdisciplinary look at the issue of changing environments through a variety of lenses. These lenses include changing visual and cultural interpretations of the sea, Maine’s changing roles in international trade, the changing role of literary figures in marine conservation, and the ways that climate change impacts fisheries. Advance registration is required, tickets will not be available at the door. An optional boxed lunch can be ordered during registration; attendees are also free to go off-site to enjoy Bath’s restaurants for lunch. Boxed lunches must be ordered in advance. Schedule: 9:00-9:30 AM        Check-in and Coffee Reception 9:30 AM                Opening Remarks 10:00 AM              The “Liquid, Mystic Theme” in American Art: Shifting Perceptions of the Sea Katherine Manthorne, Professor of Art History, City University of New York 10:50-11:00 AM    Break 11:00 AM              From Guangzhou to Augusta: The Influence of the Delano Family of Maine on the Changing Environment of the Early-U.S. Sino Trade Thomas H. Cox, Associate Professor of History, Sam Houston State University 12:00-1:30 PM       Lunch 1:30  PM               Creating a Hurricane? The Double Life of Marcus Mote’s Shipwreck at Sea, 1883                               Julia Stephens May, Assistant Professor, University of Virginia 2:20 PM                 Fish Tale: A Hemingway Marlin in Maine                               Susan F. Beegel, Former Editor of The Hemingway Review 3:10–3:20 PM       Break 3:20 PM                 The Future of Fishing in a Rapidly Warming Gulf of Maine Marissa McMahan, Senior Fisheries Scientist, Manomet Anne Hayden, Program Manager, Sustainable Economies Program, Manomet 4:10 PM                 Closing Remarks 4:30–6:00  PM       Reception

Harbor of Spies: A Novel of Historic Havana; Talk and Book Signing

Maine Maritime Museum 243 Washington St, Bath, ME

Harbor of Spies:  A Novel of Historic Havana is an historical suspense novel set in Cuba at the height of the Civil War.  Havana was then alive with blockade runners, spies and slave traders.  Robin Lloyd's illustrated talk with period paintings, lithographs and photographs will reveal the history and inspiration behind his new seafaring novel and show period images of old Havana, its harbor, the ships that formed the Naval blockade in the Gulf of Mexico and those that dared to try to pass through it. The talk will tell the story of Cuba's role in the American Civil War and reveal why Havana was one of the most important foreign ports supplying the Confederacy. A book signing will follow the talk.

Talk and Book Signing: Into the Raging Sea: Thirty-Three Mariners, One Megastorm, and the Sinking of the El Faro

Maine Maritime Museum 243 Washington St, Bath, ME

Into the Raging Sea, a national bestseller and one of NPR's "Best Books of 2018," recounts the loss of the container ship El Faro, in 2015's Hurricane Joaquin.  Rachel Slade, acclaimed for her investigative journalism, unravels the mystery surrounding this recent shipwreck. Copies of the book will be available for purchase, and a book signing will follow the talk.

Lecture: Tow Salvage or Vessel Recovery? An Introduction to Salvage Laws at Work

Maine Maritime Museum 243 Washington St, Bath, ME

Captain Bruce White will share his experience with Sea Tow to unravel the complexity of salvage laws.  Explore the differences between salvage, a simple tow, and a vessel recovery through real-world examples of boating accidents off of Maine's coast.

Lecture: Modern Oceanographic Equipment and the Search for the Schooner Wyoming

Maine Maritime Museum 243 Washington St, Bath, ME

John Perry Fish led an oceanographic team on a 20-year search for the final resting place of the Bath-built, six-masted schooner Wyoming, which was located in 2003 off the coast of Cape Cod.  The operation encountered sharks, fierce tidal currents and coastal storms.In this presentation, Fish will detail the technology employed in the search for the Wyoming and the latest equipment used in modern ocean searches. Fish has managed over 350 at-sea search operations for lost submerged objects from 747 aircraft to modern, historic and treasure ships.  His company operations have spanned the globe with search operations performed in Europe, China, Australia and South America.

Talk: Sunken Steamboats of Moosehead Lake

Maine Maritime Museum 243 Washington St, Bath, ME

Director Ryan Robbins and Producer Liz McKeil will provide a behind-the-scenes look at the making of a new documentary set to premier in 2020 featuring never-before-seen underwater footage revealing the discovery and history of the sunken steamships in Moosehead Lake. https://youtu.be/Lm8btql_65M

Portland memorial: Recognition ceremony for New England’s Titanic

Maine Maritime Museum 243 Washington St, Bath, ME

Learn more about the Portland vessel, the sinking, the discovery, the lives lost, and the shipwreck’s cultural significance to the sanctuary. This live interaction welcomes you to a ceremony to memorialize the tragedy of the Portland Gale of 1898. Additionally, you will meet the research team and learn about expedition operations. This program offers insight on the history of Portland, a memorial ceremony, and an opportunity to connect with the expedition team.

Deep-sea exploration: Biology and archaeology in Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary

Maine Maritime Museum 243 Washington St, Bath, ME

Explore the shipwrecks lying on the seafloor of NOAA's Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary in Massachusetts Bay. This live interaction will connect you to the expedition scientists who study the communities of marine life that make shipwrecks their home. Additionally, you will learn the stories behind Portland by visiting the vessel on the seafloor. This program will focus on the biological and archaeological significance of the Portland shipwreck in one of America's underwater treasures.

Deep-sea exploration: Biology and archaeology in Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary

Maine Maritime Museum 243 Washington St, Bath, ME

Explore the shipwrecks lying on the seafloor of NOAA's Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary in Massachusetts Bay. This live interaction will connect you to the expedition scientists who study the communities of marine life that make shipwrecks their home. Additionally, you will learn the stories behind Portland by visiting the vessel on the seafloor. This program will focus on the biological and archaeological significance of the Portland shipwreck in one of America's underwater treasures. 

Lecture: The History and Process of Shipwreck Archaeology

Maine Maritime Museum 243 Washington St, Bath, ME

Prof. Warren Riess will explain the significance, possibilities, fieldwork, analysis, and ethics of this unique endeavor.  Riess will use maritime archaeology examples mostly in Maine.

Lecture: Maine’s Deep Connection to Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary: Currents, Cod and Shipwrecks

Maine Maritime Museum 243 Washington St, Bath, ME

Using stunning imagery captured with underwater drones and by divers, Ben Haskell, Deputy Superintendent of Stellwagen Bank will take the audience on a tour of several iconic shipwrecks that were built in Maine.  Among them is the steamship Portland which sank in the Gale of 1898 with all hands on board. Along the way he will describe the marine life that have make the shipwrecks their home and how the Maine Coastal Current contributes to the amazing productivity of the Sanctuary.

An Energetic History of Maritime Maine: The Role of Energy in Shaping Maritime History

Maine Maritime Museum 243 Washington St, Bath, ME

Coal, wood, water, wind – humans have a long history of using these resources to heat our homes and fuel our energy needs. Lincoln Paine, an internationally published maritime historian, will share his insights on how Maine’s maritime history was shaped by the growing need for energy, past and present. This event will also be a book signing for Down East: An Illustrated History of Maritime Maine.

A Frozen Kingdom: Commerce & Pleasure in the Maine Winter

MMM Chief Curator, Christopher Timm, will share his insights on organizing our winter exhibit Frozen Kingdom and reveal some of Maine’s most intriguing stories connected to Maine’s notoriously frigid winters. This event is FREE with museum admission.

The Discovery of the USS Eagle 56 Shipwreck

Maine Maritime Museum 243 Washington St, Bath, ME

In April 1945, as WWII was coming to an end, the US patrol boat mysteriously exploded in Portland’s harbor. Despite surviving crew members’ adamant claims they were torpedoed by a German U-boat, the US Navy declared the tragedy a result of an accidental boiler explosion. The Navy has since corrected their assessment and the shipwreck has recently been discovered. Ryan King, the lead diver and underwater photographer, will share Eagle 56’s story and how his team uncovered the mystery of her location.

Maine Ships in the Arctic

The Arctic regions have long drawn the interest of daring adventures. Several Maine-built ships vessels have journeyed, explored, and worked in these dangerous ice and fog shrouded waters. Join historian and teacher Charles Lagerbom in a look at the history of numerous vessels that were launched in Maine and ventured to Arctic waters – with some not to return. This event is FREE with admission.

The Effect of Climate Change on Maine’s Infamous Winters

Maine Maritime Museum 243 Washington St, Bath, ME

Maine State Climatologist, Sean Birkel, focuses his research on finding ways to effectively model changes in the local climate and artic ice sheets. Sean will translate his data and observations to reveal how and why Maine’s winters are evolving and their effect on Maine’s tourism and industry.

POSTPONED: Schooner Bowdoin: From Arctic Explorer to Maritime Teacher

Maine Maritime Museum 243 Washington St, Bath, ME

Eric Jergensen, Assistant Professor of Marine Transportation at Maine Maritime Academy, shares his knowledge of navigation on board the historic arctic schooner, Bowdoin, with new generation of students. Eric will share Bowdoin’s history in the icy arctic and the vessel’s present role as an educational classroom.

Stories from the Sea: Fishing Communities Revealed with Natalie Springuel

Maine Maritime Museum 243 Washington St, Bath, ME

The presentation will occur remotely and be screened live in Maine Maritime Museum’s Long Reach Hall. Scattered among Maine’s coastal communities, in historical societies, museums, libraries, community radio stations and schools, the voices of Maine’s fishing community members have been recorded for posterity. These voices can illustrate the past and help us plan for the future. With ecological shifts happening today as a result of climate change and other drivers, the local fisheries knowledge contained in Maine’s rich oral history archives is a critical source of information about ecology and coastal communities. But not if the recordings are sitting on shelves collecting dust. This talk will reflect an effort to bring those stories to life. Through audio clips past and present, maps, diagrams, timelines, and photos, the project aims to highlight fishermen and community voices so they can be useful for decision-making, community development and cultural heritage. Natalie Springuel has been a marine extension associate with University of Maine Sea Grant since 2000. Based at College of the Atlantic in Bar Harbor, her extension programs address working waterfronts and coastal access, fisheries heritage, and sustainable tourism planning. She is the coordinator of the Downeast Fisheries Trail, a founder of the National Working Waterfront Network, and host of the award winning public affairs show on WERU Community Radio called Coastal Conversations.

Cultivating Leadership on Maine’s Islands

Online Event

A presentation on cultivating youth leadership in education, research and technology, through the Island Institute's Island Fellows Program. The Island Institute is a pioneer in cultivating Maine's island and coastal communities. Their initiatives in building leadership, as well as economic and environmental sustainability, bring opportunity and support to these unique cultures. Karen Burns, Chief Talent Officer, will provide insight into these island communities and the Island Institute's Island Fellows Program, which places recent college graduates in multi-year fellowships among Maine's island communities. Burns will share some inspiring stories of the program's success in cultivating youth leadership in education, research and technology. This event will be held online, via Zoom. Members $3; nonmembers $5

Shibori & Indigo Dyeing, Talk and Demonstration

Maine Maritime Museum 243 Washington St, Bath, ME

Kathleen Goddu, a featured artist in the Interwoven exhibit, will host a lecture and demonstration of traditional Japanese Shibori (indigo-dyed fabric) techniques and the indigo dyeing process. Goddu will introduce the cultural and economic importance of indigo to Japanese culture and textile arts that inspired beautiful textile traditions that continue to influence today’s fashions. Attendees will have the opportunity to view examples of historic Japanese textiles and Goddu’s shibori fabrics up-close. This workshop is part of the Donnell Family Forum, a series of exhibits, workshops, and lectures inspired by the lives of the Donnells, a 19th century family whose home is now a part of Maine Maritime Museum.  

New England Coast Guard Stories: Remarkable Mariners

In this online, interactive lecture, author-journalist Dyke Hendrickson presents on his book, New England Coast Guard Stories: Remarkable Mariners. A former editor and reporter with the Portland Press Herald and the Central Maine Morning Sentinel of Waterville, Mr. Hendrickson is the recipient of several writing awards. He has resided in several Maine seaside communities and although he now lives in Newburyport, MA, he is a historian with the Merrimack River Watershed Council and continues to speak, via Zoom, to clubs, associations, and historical gatherings on the history of the Coast Guard and the Merrimack River. In addition to his work in Maine, he has been a writer for the New Orleans Times-Picayune and the Boston Herald and as a contributor to USA Today, the Boston Globe and Tennis magazine. Mr. Hendrickson's book, New England Coast Guard Stories: Remarkable Mariners, is available to purchase both in the Maine Maritime Museum store or in addition to your ticket to this online presentation.

Free

“Unboxing” A Sailor’s Treasure: A Behind-the-Scenes Look

Maine Maritime Museum's new exhibit, A Sailor's Treasure: Sea Chests & Curiosities, provides a peek inside the sailor's sea chest - a place where both the essential and the exotic were stowed while at sea. Join Chief Curator Christopher Timm as he shares how the exhibit came to fruition, the stories behind some of the artifacts, and a look at objects from the collection that had to be left unpacked.   Members $3; nonmembers $5 This is a Zoom event.

Did X Ever Really Mark the Spot? Piracy in Popular Culture

Perhaps none have had a greater influence on our collective imagination of pirates as Robert Louis Stevenson. The Muppets, Disney, N.C. Wyeth, and countless others have shaped popular ideas of piracy based on Stevenson's Treasure Island. Walk the plank with Maine Maritime Museum's Assistant Curator, Paul Fuller, for a fun and lighthearted peek at some popular piracy myths and an examination of the map of how we got here in the first place.   Members $3; nonmembers $5 This is a Zoom event.

Wardrobe Wonderment: A Glimpse at Apparel and Adornment

Raid the closet with Maine Maritime Museum's Collections Manager, Kelly Page, for a head-to-toe exploration of occupational garments, imported dress, and some items of surprising composition. See how materials, origins, and purposes reflected in MMM's textile and personal accessory collections weave threads in a number of historical narratives including material culture, technology, fashion, and globalization.   Members $3; nonmembers $5 This is a Zoom event.  

Sailor Souvenirs: Tides of Cultural Exchange

Sarah Timm, Manager of Interpretation at Maine Maritime Museum, will discuss objects from MMM's collection that were collected by 19th century Maine captains and crews during their stops in ports around the world during a period of rapid globalized trade. The souvenirs Maine sailors chose to bring home often tell us more about an American worldview than the cultures they are intended to represent. Explore themes of authenticity, cultural appropriation, and the effects of cultural exchange by tracing how these souvenirs transformed in meaning and function once they arrived to American shores.   Members $3; nonmembers $5 This is a Zoom event.

Community in Print: History of Printing in Bath

Maine Maritime Museum 243 Washington St, Bath, ME

As owners of the Bath Printing Company, Tom and Ash Kahrl, have inherited a wealth of Bath history preserved in antique printing plates. Join Tom and Ash as they trace Bath history through prints and share the 75-year history of how Bath Printing has served the community. From letterpress to the digital age, learn how the shop meets the needs of a wide-range of local customers through historic examples and print technique demonstrations. This lecture is FREE, but preregistration is required. Generously sponsored by

Free

How Will Maine Fishing Families Weather the Storm: with Susan Conley and Monique Coombs

Maine Maritime Museum 243 Washington St, Bath, ME

How Will Maine Fishing Families Weather the Storm: A Conversation Between a Bestselling Maine Writer and a Leading Maine Fishing Advocate Join Maine Maritime Museum and The Maine Coast Fisherman’s Association for a talk with Maine author Susan Conley, author of the new, bestselling novel Landslide, and Monique Coombs, Director of Community Programs at the Maine Coast Fisherman’s Association. Conley is a fourth-generation Mainer who grew up in Midcoast Maine. Her latest novel Landslide is a love letter to her home state that in part asks what can be done to save commercial fishing in Maine—one of the state’s most storied industries. The novel takes us to a modern fishing village where livelihoods are jeopardized by warming waters. As compelling as it is moving, the book speaks to the landslide of change that Maine fishing families face today. Many argue that there isn’t a more sustainable commercial fishery than Maine’s, but how will the state and its fishing families weather the coming changes? Susan will be joined by Maine Coast Fisherman’s Associations Director of Community Programs Monique Coombs, who works with commercial fishermen to bring sustainability to Maine fishing and fishing families, and is also a wife and mother of a Maine fishing family. Susan Conley grew up in Midcoast Maine and is the author of five critically acclaimed books, including her recent, bestselling novel Landslide which was named a New York Times “Editor’s Choice” and a “Best Book” by Good Morning America, The New York Post, and others. She’s been awarded multiple fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, as well as fellowships from the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, The Maine Arts Commission, and the Massachusetts Arts Council. She's won the Maine Book Award and the Maine Award for Publishing Excellence and has been a featured Tedx Speaker, where her talk the "Power of Story," has been viewed widely. She lives with her family in Portland, Maine, where she’s the co-founder of the Telling Room, a youth creative writing center. Monique Coombs is Director of Community Programs at the Maine Coast Fisherman’s Association where she works with commercial fishermen to develop ways to protect, persevere, and revitalize Maine's working waterfronts, bringing sustainability to fishing and fishing families. Monique is also a wife and mother of a local fishing family with intimate knowledge of the challenges fishing families face. Monique has been published in National Fisherman, Commercial Fisheries News, Heated, HuffPost Green, and Civil Eats. Proceeds from this event will benefit both Maine Maritime Museum and the Maine Coast Fisherman's Association. Copies of Landslide will be available for purchase at the talk and through our online reservations.  

Reflecting on Maine’s Maritime Heritage: Photos and Prints

Maine Maritime Museum 243 Washington St, Bath, ME

Meet Charles Norris, a local artist and printmaker, as he walks us through his many visual inspirations when recording his own impressions of the Maine coast and its vessels. Norris's long family and professional history in Bath, Popham, other local communities imbues his work with a unique sense of place and heritage. Learn how illustrated maritime books, historical charts, and maritime artifacts influence the artist's approach to design and composition. This lecture is FREE; preregistration is required. Generously sponsored by

Free

Perspectives on Carroll Thayer Berry

Maine Maritime Museum 243 Washington St, Bath, ME

Carroll Thayer Berry's prints captured the movement and culture of Maine's shipyards and people in the mid-20th century using a distinctive style of dynamic line and geometry. Join Penobscot Marine Museum's Richard Saltonstall, Jr. Curator of Maritime History, Cipperly Good, as she shares interesting perspectives on this prolific Maine printmaker, garnered from PMM's extensive collection of Berry's photographs and prints. As Good speaks remotely from PMM, lecture participants will also have an opportunity to get an up-close view of Maine Maritime Museum's Berry prints. This lecture is FREE, but preregistration is required. Generously sponsored by

Free

Marine Debris : Effects on Seabird Island Habitats

Maine Maritime Museum 243 Washington St, Bath, ME

Dr. Donald Lyons of National Audubon Seabird Institute, presents on the effects of marine debris on Seabird Island Habitats. Maine Islands support many species of breeding seabirds, including several species listed as endangered, threatened, and of special concern. The islands accumulate marine debris throughout the year, but especially during seasonal storms and high tides when debris, including derelict lobster traps, washes ashore. This derelict gear poses threats to the breeding birds who use the islands for nesting. With the support of a Community-based Marine Debris Removal Grant, the Seabird Restoration Program of the National Audubon Society is working on several Maine islands to remove marine debris and study the accumulation of debris on the islands. In partnership with the Gulf of Maine Lobster Foundation and local lobster fishermen, they will also aim to reduce the rate of accumulation through at-sea removal of derelict fishing gear. This project took place on Stratton Island, Bluff Island, Jenny Island, Pond Island National Wildlife Refuge, Matinicus Rock, and Eastern Egg Rock Island.

Free

Thinking About Climate Change: History and Policy

Maine Maritime Museum 243 Washington St, Bath, ME

The Arctic and Gulf of Maine are widely recognized as "canaries in the coal mine" for signaling the impact of global warming. Dealing with climate change will take a mix of actions. How can individuals make a difference for a global problem? John Zittel has been working to understand the variety of measures that are possible to address the climate challenge. This unique workshop will foster discussion on how to recognize the problem, identify national and global action, and empower participants to learn how to take local action such as reducing emissions, capturing carbon dioxide, and navigating market and policy options at our disposal. Participants will be empowered to learn and brainstorm ways to initiate local long and short-term solutions. This is a free workshop

Free

Mapping the Maine Coast at Mid-Century

Maine Maritime Museum 243 Washington St, Bath, ME

In this richly illustrated lecture, Libby Bischof, Executive Director of the Osher Map Library and Smith Center for Cartographic Education and Professor of History at the University of Southern Maine, explores the role of 20th century women mapmakers in portraying the Maine Coast on maps made for residents and tourists alike, with an emphasis on pictorial maps made by Ruth Rhoads Lepper, Mildred C. Green, Katherine Dudley, and others. These colorful and highly detailed maps combine deep historical research with artistic and cartographic skill, and we'll compare examples from Maine with maps produced throughout New England. Midcoast Maine Map: Ruth Rhoads Lepper, Mid-Coast Maine, 1979. From the Collection of the Osher Map Library and Smith Center for Cartographic Education, Univeristy of Southern Maine.

Virtual Event: Preserving Passamaquoddy Traditions

Maine Maritime Museum 243 Washington St, Bath, ME

Join Donald Soctomah, author, Passamaquoddy tribal historian, and storyteller, as he introduces ancestral birch bark traditions preserved in traditional canoe building and ongoing efforts in tribal stewardship of the land and waters. Mr. Soctomah's commitment to teaching native culture has led to an impressive collection of work including publications on histories of the Passamaquoddy tribe, children's books, compilations of tribal music, and historical films. This lecture is FREE, but preregistration is required. Registrants will receive a Zoom link via email. Generously sponsored by

Free
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